The role of Michael Lacey in the field of mathematics

Michael Thoreau Lacey is an American mathematician. He was born on September 26, 1959. Lacey is a Ph.D. holder from the University of Illinois which he obtained in 1987.

His area of study was the probability in Banach spaces. Throughout his studies, he covered the mathematical areas of ergodic theory, probability, and harmonic analysis.

After completing his first doctorate studies, he joined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Louisiana State University for postdoctoral work experience. Together with Walter Philipp, they came up with the proof of the central limit theorem. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://angel.co/michael-lacey-3

Between 1989 and 1996 he worked at the Indiana University. During his tenure, he received a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. It is during this Fellowship that he started studying the bilinear Hilbert transform. Together with Christoph Thiele they solved the issues around bilinear Hilbert transform and were awarded the Salem price in 1996. Read more: Mike Lacey | Crunchbase and Michael Lacey | Facebook

In 1996, he joined Georgia Institute of Technology as a Professor of Mathematics. In 2004, through joint work with Xiaochun Li, he earned the Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2012 he was inducted into the American Mathematical Society.

Michael Lacey, in 1998, addressed the International Mathematics Congress (ICM) as a guest speaker in Berlin on the topic of bilinear Hilbert Transform).

Other achievements he has had in the field of mathematics include work they did with a group of four (Pascal Auscher, Alan McIntosh, Philippe Tchamitchian, and Steve Hofmann). Together they solved the “Kato root problem.” They applied this theory in solving 3D elliptical differential operators.

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